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How to Brighten Your Career as an Aesthetic Nurse?

Mark John

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Aesthetic Nurse

Photo by MedicAlert UK on Unsplash

Nurses contribute to society in a variety of ways, and aesthetic or cosmetic nurses are no exception. These professionals go through extensive aesthetic nurse training and get their degrees and certifications. They would aid clients with non-invasive, in-office procedures, including injectables and skincare treatments if they pursued this professional path.

Surgeons and cosmetic doctors frequently enlist the assistance of aesthetic nurses, who provide pre and post-operative treatment and patient care under the supervision of a physician.

What Does It Mean to Become an Aesthetic/Cosmetic Nurse?

Registered nurses who work as aesthetic/cosmetic nurses provide a wide range of services. Dermal filler and Botox neurotoxin injections, photo facials, dermabrasion, micro-needling, tattoo removal, and non-surgical body sculpting are some of the options.

In employment descriptions and job listings, some businesses use the alternate spellings “aesthetic nurse” or “esthetician’s nurse.” We’ll use the usual spelling of “aesthetic nurse” in this article.

Typically, these nurses work in offices or medical spas associated with plastic surgeries or cosmetic dermatology practices. Cosmetic nurses work with a diverse group of patients who want to improve their looks and self-esteem.

The majority of patients seeking this type of therapy are women, but men are increasingly seeking it and increasing demand for medical aesthetics operations.

An Aesthetic Nurse’s Average Salary

Aesthetic/cosmetic nurses’ pay varies depending on their education, certification, experience, and where they work. According to ZipRecruiter, the average yearly income for a cosmetic nurse is $85,621. However, some earn as much as $124,000, with the country’s middle 25th percentile ranging from $69,000 to $99,500.

Cosmetic nurses with the most expertise in their specialty are paid the most. Extra advantages like paid vacation and sick leave, health, dental, and eye insurance plans, prescription drug coverage, and educational expense reimbursement are common.

What Does It Take to Become an Aesthetic Nurse?

If you wish to work as an aesthetic nurse, you’ll need to follow the steps below.

Step 1: Obtain Your Registered Nurse (RN) License

A registered nurse degree, either a 2-year associate’s degree in nursing (ADN) or a 4-year bachelor of science in nursing (BSN), is required to work as an aesthetic/cosmetic nurse.

In line with the national push for advanced practice nurses, some nurses choose to pursue a master’s degree in nursing in addition to their BSN.

Step 2: Pass the NCLEX-RN (National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses)

After graduating from a recognized nursing institution, you’ll need to pass the NCLEX-RN exam to be licensed by one or more states.

Step 3: Accumulate Experience

Training in areas of expertise with a board-certified doctor in plastic/aesthetic/cosmetic surgery, dermatology, facial plastic surgery, or ophthalmology for at least two years is required.

Step 4: Obtain a Credential as a Certified Aesthetic Nurse Specialist

Consider acquiring the Certified Aesthetic Nursing Specialist degree from the Plastic Surgical Nursing Certification Board (PSNCB) to position you for the greatest aesthetic/cosmetic nurse positions.

To get this certification, you must pass an exam offered by the PSNCB in the spring and fall of each year. Unlike several credentials, the PSNCB certification does not require any additional training.

How Long It May Take to Become an Aesthetic Nurse?

ADN, BSN, or MSN degrees can take anywhere from 2 to 5 years to complete.

2 years of core competencies experience working with a board-certified physician in plastic/aesthetic/cosmetic surgery, dermatology, facial plastic surgery, or ophthalmology.

What Does the Future Hold for Aesthetic Nurses?

Nurses are projected to be in high demand in the United States for the foreseeable future. Registered nurse positions may expand by 7% until 2029, according to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

Professionals with aesthetic nurse training should expect job security because new clinical treatments are produced every day, and there is a growing need for cosmetic and aesthetic services. Especially since this field is expected to expand over the next few years.

What Are the Duties of Aesthetic Nurses?

Plastic surgeons and dermatologists employ aesthetic/cosmetic nurses to assist them with cosmetic operations. These medical operations, whether invasive or non-invasive, are frequently performed to improve the look of patients.

Patients seek therapy for medical reasons in some circumstances; in others, the operations might boost confidence and a more youthful appearance.

Aesthetic/cosmetic nurses might have various professional tasks, depending on whether they work full-time or part-time.

Before providing services, patients are consulted, which includes scheduling, interviewing, and medical screening.

  • Skin examination to detect aging and other health issues.
  • Pre-operative and post-operative care is provided.
  • Assisting with treatments and operations for the doctor.
  • Instruments and surgery suites are prepared and sterilized.
  • Botox and filler injections, chemical peels, laser hair removal, dermabrasion, CoolSculpting, tattoo removal,
  • and more procedures are available.

Aesthetic nurses usually work in dermatology and plastic surgery offices, med spas and may also help in operating rooms in hospitals. Surgery nurses’ schedules are occasionally disrupted by emergencies or adverse responses to treatments, but aesthetic nurses work regular hours in most situations.

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